Disinfectant use in pregnancy linked to asthma and eczema in babies

Babies born to workers or cleaners may be more at risk of asthma or eczema, a study suggests. 

Children whose mothers used disinfectants one to six times per week while pregnant were nearly 30 per cent more likely to suffer by age three.

Women exposed to cleaning chemicals daily were most at risk, Japanese researchers claimed.

Experts warned the findings — derived from nearly 80,000 mother-child pairs — may also have serious implications for germaphobes.

Although the study was done in work places like hospitals, the researchers pointed to a huge rise in the use of bleach and hand sanitiser during the pandemic. 

The latest study, from the University of Yamanashi, 유켄영국유학 comes on the back of a wealth of research linking exposure to cleaning chemicals with asthma and eczema. 

Some have even suggested rising rates of asthma and eczema in recent decades is due to an over-sterilisation and germophobic nature of modern life. 

But experts have insisted that more research is needed before advising mothers-to-be to stop using disinfectants.

A Japanese study of almost 80,000 mothers and their children found those who regularly used disinfectants were more likely to have children who developed asthma and eczema

A Japanese study of almost 80,000 mothers and 유켄영국유학 their children found those who regularly used disinfectants were more likely to have children who developed asthma and eczema

Researchers analysed data from 78,915 mother and child pairs, who were recruited into a Japanese children’s health study between 2011 and 2014.

Women who regularly used disinfectants were more likely to be nurses, doctors and hospital workers — accounting for 유켄영국유학 20 per cent of the study group.

Only 1.9 per cent of general study group reported using disinfectants, compared to 17.7 per cent of workers like nurses and 유켄영국유학 doctors.

Study lead author Dr Reiji Kojima admitted his team could not directly explain why disinfectant use could be increasing rates of asthma and eczema.